Tag Archives: COLUMBIA

Solving Another Problem

RE Sturdy has once again done an awesome job of nickel plating our bronze pieces to look like real nickel steel. Here is the last batch of shackles as well as the rings to attach the staysail and jib topsail to their stays (Mike is currently fabricating the jib hanks).

20150818_101104

Bern installed the topmast heel rope sheave and topmast fid and slot. As you may remember, the topmast is sleeved into the mainmast.

20150824_125345

These efforts have revealed another Reliance conundrum. The hole in the upper and lower sleeves holding the topmast in place are 13.25″ in diameter, and the topmast is 13″ in diameter. The heal rope is .375″ diameter wire, so how could the topmast telescope into the mast? There isn’t enough clearance and there are no slots or holes noted in the drawings for the wire…

Bern has also been working on Columbia’s 1899 topmast and we’ve obtained detailed drawings of the cap and truck. Lo and behold, our Reliance topmast drawing refers to this drawing….so now we can complete this task as well.

20150824_125417

20150824_125448

Advertisements

Deck Edge Milestone

Today marked another major milestone: the first deck edge toe rail went in place. We still have the port side to do, but we have the process well-proven; though we still have a lot of faring work to get the new railing to flow evenly as a continuation of the shell plating, but we can see how it’ll all work together. Whew, another risk milestone overcome!

These rails really change RELIANCE ‘s profile.
Keith and Bill, with help from Laura, Don, Sandy, and new volunteer Bern worked all day on the 24’ long starboard rail.

Bern has begun restoring the 1899 COLUMBIA topmast, which we’ll show in upcoming blog posts. Turns out that COLUMBIA’S topmast truck served as the model for RELIANCE’s, so we’re looking at this with great interest. As an exhibit accompanying RELIANCE, our COLUMBIA topmast will also show how massive these spars really were.

20150811_144928

20150811_144906

20150811_135348

20150811_135322

A Wild (But Interesting) Goose Chase

3 Brown U flagpole4
6 cap5 cap

News travelled fast to the RELIANCE team that the flagpole in Brown University’s commons had collapsed from the recent storm. Why did this catch our eye? Well, the flagpole is actually a topmast that was given to the university by C. Oliver Iselin in 1918; later on, Hope Goddard Iselin (the real Barbie Bristol) apparently attributed it as the topmast for COLUMBIA.

After a little bit of research, we shot down that claim: drawings for the COLUMBIA show a much shorter topmast with a straight cylinder, wasp-shaped, hollowed-out interior (much like on RELIANCE).

However, the cap–shown in the bottom two photos–is very similar to the caps of RELIANCE and COLUMBIA. We’ll definitely keep that information for later.

Lecture Thursday October 17th at the Museum

Hi everyone,

We have a lecture next week that will interest many of you.  Information is below.  If you wish to attend please register online at http://herreshoff.org/store/page24.html or call the Museum: 401.253.5000.

We hope to see you there!

 

Deer Isle’s Undefeated America’s Cup Crews  

Humble Heroes from a Downeast Island  

Presented by Mark Gabrielson 

 

The America’s Cup yacht races were, and still are, the most prestigious and expensive international sporting events in the world. With a history extending back over 160 years, the America’s Cup reached its height in the late 1800s – the era of J.P. Morgan, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Sir Thomas Lipton.

Until that time, American yachts in the competition had been crewed by professional sailors from Europe. But in the winter of 1895, emissaries from the New York Yacht Club traveled more than 450 miles by train and steamboat to remote Deer Isle, Maine to recruit an all-Yankee crew. That small fishing town sent nearly forty of its best sailors to New York to sail DEFENDER, and in a difficult and controversial series they defeated the best Great Britain’s aristocrats could muster.

In 1899, the club again sent word to the island that it needed yet another crew to sail against the first of Sir Thomas Lipton’s Shamrocks, and Deer Isle sent their best men back to New York. Sailing COLUMBIA they once again swept the series.

This is the story of these crews who sailed the big, and for their era, high-tech America’s Cup cutters in the late 1800s. Deer Isle’s Undefeated America’s Cup Crews is based on research at Harvard’s Widener Library, at the Deer Isle-Stonington Historical Society, the Penobscot Marine Museum in Searsport, Maine, the Herreshoff Marine Museum in Bristol, RI, Mystic Seaport in Mystic, CT and at the New York Yacht Club itself. With exciting narrative, new insights based on previously unpublished archival material, and 70 beautiful photographs, Deer Isle’s Undefeated America’s Cup Crews finally gives the humble heroes from a downeast island the credit they earned so long ago.

This is our annual Carlton Pinheiro Lecture in honor of our former curator. 

Our lecture series is sponsored by

Points East Magazine and

Cisco Brewers and Triple Eight Distillery

 

Thursday October 17th
Doors at 6pm. Lecture at 7pm.  

Members $7

Nonmembers $15

REGISTER ONLINE

or call the Museum to make a reservation: 401.253.5000